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American Social History Project • Center for Media and Learning

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Published March 30, 2011

ASHP/CML is continuing work in earnest on our online teacher resource database, which will be known as HERB (in honor of the late historian and our co-founder Herbert Gutman). We’ve entered more than 1,000 social history documents, teaching activities, images, and other resources, and currently are finalizing design and building a beta version with the aim of a full public launch in January 2011.

HERB is being built with Omeka, an open source curation and document management application created by George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media. We’re attempting to incorporate as much of the feedback...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

Charles E. Peterson, “Slave Quarters at the Hermitage plantation, Chatham County, Georgia,” photograph, 1934.Though rare, slave cabins still dot the landscape of the southern United States. Some are parts of plantation museums, though former quarters are seldom interpreted with the same zeal as the main house. Almost invariably, former slave quarters stand empty today, making it hard to picture the complex and vibrant communities that once occupied them. This month’s featured document is an oral history of Mary Reynolds, who recalls her girlhood growing up on cotton and sugar plantations in Louisiana. Though 105 years...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

Mission US, an innovative multimedia game project to improve learning U.S. history in middle and high schools, has received funding from theCorporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB)American History and Civics Initiative. A finalist in the nationwide competition, Mission US is an unusual cooperative effort among historians, educators, broadcasters, and gamers, with the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning (serving as the project’s principal content developer and advisor) working in a collaboration with New York’s public television stationThirteen/WNET; Electric Funstuff, a Manhattan-based game developer; and Education Development Center- ...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

In the next several months, the American Social History Project/Center for Media Learning plans to launch an online resource database of history materials for educators. To assist with planning, ASHP/CML recently conducted a survey of educators to learn more about how they use the Web to find resources for their classrooms. We were curious to know about what kinds of Web-based technology teachers had access to, what sorts of materials they look for online, and what they generally do with what they find online. We collected 228 responses from 38 states and the District of Columbia. (By the way, thank...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

On April 9, 2010, at the Organization of American Historians annual conference in Washington, D.C., ASHP/CML’s Teaching American History Programs Project Director Ellen Noonan will participate in a roundtable discussion on “Putting Pedagogy into Digital Archives: Making Online Collections Useful for K-12 Teachers and Students. William J. Tally of the Center for Children and Technology will moderate the discussion, joined by panelists Kathleen Barker of the Massachusetts Historical Society and Stacia Smith of ...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

The City University of New York’s Digital Media Studies Group, in collaboration with the Center for the Humanities and the New Media Lab, has organized an all-day conference on Wednesday, April 21, 2010, at the CUNY Graduate Center. Bringing together an invited group of media practitioners, academic publishers, digital content developers, and academics, the conference will assess the impact of digital media on academic work and academic policy. The conference will include a series of workshops, round table discussions, and panels at which participants will discuss and debate a broad range...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

 

Boy hopping freight train, Dubuque, Iowa
Boy hopping freight train, Dubuque, Iowa

During the 1930s depression hundred of thousands of young people took to the road in search of work and adventure, or to help relieve their impoverished families. Thanks to Minnesota sociologist Thomas Mineham, we have excerpts of diaries from two youths nicknamed Blink and Simple Sam. Mineham traveled the freight trains and hitchhiked among the transient youths for three years recording their experiences and words. See this month’s In the Limelight feature on ASHP/CML’s homepage to read diary excerpts and more about youth...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

The career of Howard Zinn took him from the Brooklyn shipyards to New York University on the G.I. Bill to a Ph.D. in History from Columbia University and then to the faculties of Spelman College and Boston University, where he urged his students to social activism and mightily irritated university administrators. He published A People’s History of the United States in 1980, a single volume that told a very different story of U.S. history than traditional textbooks did at...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

The American Social History Project’s website has undergone an extreme makeover! Our new, improved and vastly more informative site, which went live this month, offers easier navigability, greater clarity, and lots and lots of resources. We’ve added new features such as podcasts of talks by noted historians and teachers at our seminars and clips from our award winning documentaries. You can still keep up with our latest activities-and insights-in the ASHP blog, or find more information about our books and other projects. We hope you will take the time to visit us and we invite any...Read more

Published March 30, 2011

This fall the American Social History Project’s latest Web resource, Picturing United States History: An Interactive Resource for Teaching with Visual Evidence, will host two online forums on teaching with visual evidence. The October 2009 forum on the West will be guest-moderated by Professor Catherine Lavender of the College of Staten Island at the City University of New York; the November 2009 forum on the Civil War will be guest-moderated by Professor Alice Fahs of the University of California-Irvine.

Representing a unique collaboration between historians and art historians, Picturing U.S. History is based on the belief that visual materials...Read more

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