American Social History Project • Center for Media and Learning

The Visual Culture of the American Civil War and Its Aftermath

An NEH Summer Institute for College and University Teachers

July 11 – 22, 2016
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
New York, New York

Waud Muster

The American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York Graduate Center will host a two-week summer institute in July 2016 for 30 college and university teachers to study the visual culture of the American Civil War and its aftermath. The institute will focus on the era’s array of visual media—including the fine arts, ephemera, photography, cartoons, maps, and monuments— to examine how information and opinion about the war and its impact were recorded and disseminated, and the ways visual media expressed and shaped Americans’ views on both sides of and before and after the conflict. Participants will hear lectures by noted historians, art historians, and archivists and attend hands-on sessions in major museums and archives. A team of four institute faculty that represents the range of work in the field will introduce participants to the rich body of new scholarship that addresses or incorporates Civil War and postwar visual culture, prompt them to do further research, and help them to use visual evidence to enhance their scholarship and teaching about the war and its short- and long-term effects.

Faculty: Lynne Zacek Bassett, Joshua Brown, Sarah Burns, Keith Davis, Gregory Downs, Thavolia Glymph, Lauren Hewes, David Jaffee, Ari Kelman, Maurie McInnis, Megan Kate Nelson, Kirk Savage, Susan Schulten, Scott Manning Stevens.

Coming Soon!

schedule and syllabus

institute faculty

Application Information and instructions


stipends and housing


Application deadline: March 1, 2016
Notification date: March 31, 2016

For further information, contact:

Donna Thompson Ray, Institute Director
The Graduate Center, City University of New York
neh logo

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.